Dublin Coastal

11a3275891010b1111a12131516141918So many challenging and fulfilling memories of shooting in the depths of winter just before the deluge of snowfall. The surrounding coastal areas of Dublin are simply stunning with an abundance of character. Many have been posted before so here’s a best of .

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Tom Hoxey R.I.P.

Its been quite a year for funerals this year all having a good innings. In 2012 we celebrated my mother in law’s 90th birthday. The pub /restaurant was larger enough for me to set up a studio to photograph her and all the family including her brothers and sister all in their late 80’s early 90’s. TomUncle Tom copy passed away last month . A Wicklow sheep farmer and Hurling fan.

A fleeting visit to Kiltimagh and Knock

Alteration of Kiltimagh, Irish Coillte Mach (older Mághach), the name of a country town in Co. Mayo.” The word “culchie” is derived from the Irish word “coillte”, the plural of coill, the Irish word for “wood”, an area of growing trees. It was used, mainly in Mayo and Galway, by townspeople as a condescending reference to people from rural areas. It came into use in Dublin in the mid sixties as a counter to the country people’s use of the word “Jackeen” for Dublin people. Once referred to ‘The drinking Mecca of the west’! Although Kiltimagh has been blighted by emigration with many pubs and shops now closed down, it has retained its community spirit.

Then A quick diversion to the infamous Knock shrine .

Howth Pt 1

Howth is a favourite shooting location of mine. A bustling historic fishing village on the North side of Dublin. Restaurants and fish shops line the east side of the harbour with the yachting community on the west side . Its a walkers paradise with spectacular coastline views of Dublin Bay’s UNESCO biosphere and nearby small islands of Irelands eye and Lambay Island. With the help and cooperation of Shane O’Doherty who runs excellent hiking tours (www.shaneshowthhikes.com ) we managed to get a lower angle as possible of Bailey Lighthouse to give this almost iconic and popular photographic subject a more majestic feel. Along with official permission Shane and I took on board the safety aspect in order to endure the slippy grassy cliff. After our preparation day we returned the following morning at 5.30 am in freezing conditions but fortunately the wind had died down enough for excellent shooting conditions conducive with safety and dealing with shooting long exposures. I shot this during the various changes of light before sunrise and soon after; whilst observing and admiring the beauty unfolding which created different cloud formations, height and direction of the sun that revealed textures and forms in different areas of the landscape/seascape. Tides are also a consideration. Once I was happy with our efforts it was time to attempt to ‘liven’ things up with attracting the local seagulls to make an appearance but despite my supplies of seagull grub (chips oven cooked the night before) and with Shane’s ‘seagull whispering’ reputation, it just wasn’t to be. After all I was optimistic due to the Howth seagull reputation of diving down to steal peoples chips! Ah well, I hope it wasn’t because of the presence of Shane’s trusty dog, Bruno; who at least spotted our first sea otter. After breakfast I had a new brief to fulfil, along Howth harbour which is in Part 2 next week.

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Dublin’s coastal Dart.

white rockpassing train bcopyWhiterock copy copyKilliney dart frombeach copyWhiterockdartlookinbackcropedWhiterockdartlookinbackWhiterockdartlsunriseb copyWhiterockdartlookinbackcropedb copyWhiterocksurfbDuring my two day shoot at this chosen location, my main objective was to shoot the Dart train in a coastal setting within the boundaries of Dublin county. The Dublin Area Rapid Transit system, officially and popularly known as the DART, is an electrified rapid transit railway network serving the coastline and city centre of Dublin. The service makes up the core of Dublin’s suburban railway network , stretching from Greystones at its southernmost terminus to Howth and Malahide in north county Dublin. The DART serves 31 stations and consists of 53 kilometres of track, and carries in the region of 16 million passengers per year. See previous post on this location . Next week is Howth!